August 17, 2022

Lucy Mecklenburg reveals her 2-month-old daughter Leila was hospitalized with bronchiolitis

5 min read


Lucy Mecklenburg’s newborn daughter taken to hospital and put on oxygen after getting ‘really bad’ with bronchiolitis

Lucy Mecklenburg has revealed that her daughter Leila was taken to the hospital after getting ‘really bad’ with bronchiolitis.

Taking to Instagram on Thursday, the 30-year-old former TOWIE star shared a photo of her daughter in her hospital bed as well as one of her daughters breastfeeding to mark World Breastfeeding Awareness Month.

And in her caption Lucy, who shares Leila with fiancé Ryan Thomas, thanked NHS doctors and nurses for helping her little girl, who she revealed was given oxygen.

The Bad: Lucy Mecklenburg Reveals Her Daughter Lila Was Taken To The Hospital After Getting 'Really Bad' With Bronchiolitis

The Bad: Lucy Mecklenburg Reveals Her Daughter Lila Was Taken To The Hospital After Getting ‘Really Bad’ With Bronchiolitis

In a lengthy post, Lucy explained how her daughter had to be fed through a tube and shared her joy at being able to breastfeed again.

She wrote, ‘It’s #worldbreastfeedingawarenessweek and I wanted to share this memorable moment with you all.

‘Leela has been in the hospital with bronchiolitis since Sunday. He was being put on tube feed and oxygen.

‘This moment is that special moment she had her first proper breastfeeding again and it felt amazing. There were times in my BF trip with both of my kids that I felt like I just wanted my body for a day and sometimes felt overwhelmed by the sense of responsibility they put in me so much that Let me be fed.’

Update: On Instagram on Thursday, the 30-year-old former TOWIE star shared a photo of her daughter in her hospital bed as well as one of her daughters, to mark World Breastfeeding Awareness Month.

Update: On Instagram on Thursday, the 30-year-old former TOWIE star shared a photo of her daughter in her hospital bed as well as one of her daughters, to mark World Breastfeeding Awareness Month.

She continued: ‘This week I have felt lost in not being able to feed, or hug and play with my 2-month-old. Even though I rarely left her side, I used to miss her dearly.

A hell of a lot of worry, a lot of pumping and a lot of gratitude to the NHS doctors and nurses for getting my baby girl right again.

‘World Breastfeeding Week is all about educating, sharing and supporting so I wanted to share the meals of the week and some of the useful resources that have helped me which are connected in my stories. X.’

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Message: In her caption, Lucy, who shares Lilah with fiancé Ryan Thomas, thanked NHS doctors and nurses for helping her little girl, who she revealed was given oxygen.

Message: In her caption, Lucy, who shares Lilah with fiancé Ryan Thomas, thanked NHS doctors and nurses for helping her little girl, who she revealed was given oxygen.

Bronchiolitis is a common lower respiratory tract infection that affects babies and toddlers under the age of two.

Symptoms include adRye, persistent cough, dshortness of breath and whedging

Lucy also took to her Instagram stories to share the same image of Leila with the tubes attached to her, with the star listing her daughter’s symptoms.

She stressed that she is not qualified to provide medical advice, but hopes that by sharing symptoms, parents can know what to look for.

Poor Bubba: Lucy also took to her Instagram Stories to share the same image of Leila with the tubes attached to her, with the star listing her daughter's symptoms.

Poor Bubba: Lucy also took to her Instagram Stories to share the same image of Leila with the tubes attached to her, with the star listing her daughter’s symptoms.

She wrote: Too many messages asking where I have been for five days.

‘Unfortunately Lilla got really bad with bronchiolitis so we’ve had a few days in the hospital. She is now at home and doing well.

She continued: ‘I’m obviously not in a position to offer medical advice but it’s our experience for parents who want to know what happened and what to look out for.

‘It started with Roman I think he picked up at a pre-school, then Lila grabbed him.

‘In three days she was not coping with it very well, was having stomach sucking, worsening cough, high temperature, coughing and choking on milk and her saliva.

‘He needed some oxygen in the hospital and was tube fed for a few days. She had a nasal swab that tested positive for RSV which causes bronchiolitis.

‘Swabs are no longer routine, but with Roman’s health issues it was important for me to know exactly what he had.’

The TV personality concluded by informing her followers that her baby girl is now at home and is recovering.

She continued: ‘She’s at home and happy now, just a little sleepy and still coughing.’

What is bronchiolitis? And what are the symptoms?

Bronchiolitis is a common lower respiratory tract infection that affects babies and toddlers under the age of two.

Most cases get better without treatment in two to three weeks.

However, some babies have severe symptoms that require hospital treatment.

The initial symptoms are similar to those of a cold, such as a runny nose or cough. Over the next few days, these can develop into:

  • fever
  • dry, persistent cough
  • shortness of breath
  • wheezing

Parents should contact their GP or NHS 111 if their baby has eaten less than usual in their last few feeds or has taken a dry nappy for 12 hours.

A persistent temperature of 38°C or more and a child who looks tired or irritable can also be a cause for concern.

Parents should call 999 if their child has difficulty breathing, a blue tongue or lips, or if there is a long pause between breaths.

Bronchiolitis is caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which is spread by droplets from an infected person sneezing or coughing.

This causes the small airways in the lungs to swell, reducing the amount of air that can enter them.

About one in three babies becomes infected in the first year of life. By the age of two, nearly all children will have been infected, with about half developing bronchiolitis.

There is no medication that kills RSV but treatment is usually not needed.

Only two to three percent of babies with bronchiolitis need to be taken to the hospital.

If a child becomes infected, parents should ensure that they stay hydrated and give them painkillers if necessary.

Bronchiolitis is difficult to prevent but the following may help:

  • Wash your hands and that of your baby frequently
  • Wash or wipe down toys and surfaces regularly
  • Keep newborns away from people with colds or flu
  • Keep infected children at home until their symptoms clear up
  • Do not expose your child to smoke

Source: NHS Choices

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