Ola Jordan reveals she would love to have more children and undergo IVF again


Ola Jordan revealed she would love to have more children as she discussed conceiving daughter Ella after one round of IVF treatment.

The former Strictly Come Dancing star, 39, welcomed daughter Ella, two, with husband James, 44, in 2020 after three years of trying for a baby.

Ella was conceived after one round of IVF, with Ola and James previously being incredibly open about their battle to have a child.

Family: Ola Jordan revealed she would love to have more children as she discussed conceiving daughter Ella after one round of IVF treatment

Family: Ola Jordan revealed she would love to have more children as she discussed conceiving daughter Ella after one round of IVF treatment

Ola has now shared her hopes of having more children and revealed she will turn to IVF again if she struggles to have a child naturally.

Speaking to GB News on Thursday, Ola said: “I would love to have more children if it happens naturally, if not I will go for another IVF, yes.”

The dancer has spoken candidly about feeling like she left it too late to have a child because she focused on her career – which saw her star on Strictly from 2006 to 2015.

“I’ve had an amazing career traveling the world, and then you kind of forget yourself sometimes and you’re like, ‘Oh, actually, I’ve probably missed the boat here,'” she admitted.

First child: The former Strictly Come Dancing star, 39, welcomed daughter Ella, two, with husband James, 44, in 2020 after three years of trying for a baby

First child: The former Strictly Come Dancing star, 39, welcomed daughter Ella, two, with husband James, 44, in 2020 after three years of trying for a baby

Speaking about the decision to undergo IVF after fertility issues, Ola admitted she found it “very difficult” because she didn’t know who to turn to for support.

She said women still don’t want to talk about going through IVF and said she doesn’t “understand” why she doesn’t get pregnant when many of her friends are giving birth.

She explained: “It’s really hard because you don’t know who to turn to. Most of my friends got pregnant so easily.

“I didn’t understand why I wasn’t getting pregnant. I was healthy, fit, I was a professional dancer.

Candid: Ella was conceived after one round of IVF, with Ola and James previously incredibly open about their battle to have a child

Candid: Ella was conceived after one round of IVF, with Ola and James previously incredibly open about their battle to have a child

“It’s very difficult and it’s very difficult to reach out to anyone because everyone was getting pregnant around me.

“But then when I went through IVF and announced that I was going to go through IVF, I suddenly found all those women coming up to me and saying, ‘I’ve done IVF,’ so suddenly there were a lot of women I could talk to.

“It’s still a topic that people don’t want to talk about, unfortunately.”

But Ola admitted she had a “very positive” experience with IVF, which saw her conceive her daughter Ella after one cycle of treatment.

“I needed help and I had to go through IVF, which was obviously great for me because it was the first time it happened and it was a very positive experience,” she said.

Fertility: Now Ola (pictured with James and Ella) has opened up about her hopes of having more children and revealed she will turn to IVF again if she struggles to have a child naturally

Fertility: Now Ola (pictured with James and Ella) has opened up about her hopes of having more children and revealed she will turn to IVF again if she struggles to have a child naturally

“But at the same time, it’s something you don’t really want to do. You want to conceive naturally.

She also addressed women who are delaying childbearing due to the cost of living and the Covid-19 pandemic, but said she would not want other women to “leave it too late” and “struggle”.

“Things have changed significantly, 49% of women are delaying having children because of things like the cost of living, Covid and the war in Ukraine, which I understand,” she said.

“Ask yourself a question here. Do I want to bring a child into a world like this?

– But it’s hard. It’s hard because we just have to remind ourselves, you don’t want to leave it too late and then struggle with it alone.

Tough times: Speaking about the decision to undergo IVF, Ola (pictured with James) admitted she found it 'very difficult' because she didn't know who to turn to for support

Tough times: Speaking about the decision to undergo IVF, Ola (pictured with James) admitted she found it ‘very difficult’ because she didn’t know who to turn to for support

This isn’t the first time Ola has opened up about her fertility issues, having previously said she wished she had tried for a baby sooner.

Last year, Ola said she would have prioritized starting a family earlier if she had known she would struggle to conceive.

She said The sun: “You don’t think you’re going to have to go through IVF until it’s been going on for a long time and you’re like, ‘There’s definitely a problem, we need to look at it.'”

“So I guess I’d try earlier.” But then we had careers, we were doing things, we were busy. I guess you’re never ready, but I definitely would (had tried earlier) if I knew I’d struggle to get pregnant.

Joy: But Ola admitted she had a 'very positive' experience with IVF which saw her conceive daughter Ella after one cycle of treatment

Joy: But Ola admitted she had a ‘very positive’ experience with IVF which saw her conceive daughter Ella after one cycle of treatment

Children: Last year Ola (pictured pregnant with Ella) said she would have prioritized starting a family earlier if she had known she would struggle to conceive

Children: Last year Ola (pictured pregnant with Ella) said she would have prioritized starting a family earlier if she had known she would struggle to conceive

Ola said she and James, who married in 2003, were focusing on their careers, saying: “You have to choose between something like Strictly or having a family, unfortunately.”

The star said she couldn’t do Strictly – which she starred in from 2006-2015 – with a baby as the BBC show is a “six or seven month” commitment and she has no one to look after her child.

Speaking to the Sun about her daughter and the IVF process, Ola said: “We’re so lucky it happened on the first try and we’re extremely blessed to have Ella, she’s such a little character.”

She added: “There are so many people who go through IVF and it doesn’t happen for them. And there are a lot of people who want a baby and can’t afford one.

How does IVF work?

In vitro fertilization, known as IVF, is a medical procedure in which a woman has an already fertilized egg implanted into her womb to become pregnant.

It is used when couples cannot conceive naturally and the sperm and egg are removed from their bodies and combined in a laboratory before the embryo is placed in the woman.

Once the embryo is in the womb, the pregnancy should continue normally.

The procedure can be performed using eggs and sperm from a couple or from donors.

National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines recommend that IVF should be offered by the NHS to women under 43 who have been trying to conceive through regular unprotected sex for two years.

People can also pay for IVF privately, which costs an average of £3,348 per cycle, according to figures published in January 2018, and there is no guarantee of success.

The NHS says the success rate for women under 35 is around 29 per cent, with the chance of a successful cycle decreasing with age.

It is estimated that around eight million babies have been born through IVF since the first case, Britain’s Louise Brown, born in 1978.

Chances of success

The success rate of IVF depends on the age of the woman undergoing treatment, as well as the cause of the infertility (if known).

Younger women are more likely to have a successful pregnancy.

IVF is generally not recommended for women over the age of 42, as the chances of a successful pregnancy are thought to be too low.

Between 2014 and 2016, the percentage of IVF treatments that resulted in a live birth was:

29 percent for women under 35

23 percent for women ages 35 to 37

15 percent for women aged 38 to 39

9 percent for women ages 40 to 42

3 percent for women ages 43 to 44

2 percent for women over 44



Source link